Step onto our fully enclosed Deep Ocean Escalator and you’ll be transported through the Sharks of the Deep Exhibit, presented by Cox. The first of its kind, this fully enclosed escalator draws you deeper and deeper into an underwater world where you’re completely surrounded by thousands of mysterious ocean creatures. On your ride, don't miss the giant rays flying overhead, gliding like kites in the wind, or the whitetip reef sharks emerging from the shadows. See if you can spot our rescued sea turtles, all 8 shark species, and 3 different large schooling fish!

 

Can’t take the escalator? Don’t worry, we have an elevator, too!

Did You Know?
Deep ocean escalator

The first of its kind, our Deep Ocean Escalator is a fully encased acrylic tunnel that takes you on a descent through the 200,000 gallon Sharks of the Deep habitat.

Watch sharks of the deep

Dive into the deep ocean exhibit through our live shark cam.

Notable species

California Leopard Shark

Leopard shark

(Triakis semifasciata)

The leopard shark is aplacental viviparous, meaning that the young hatch inside the uterus and are nourished by the yolk.

Diet

Clams, spoon worms, crabs, shrimp, bony fish, and fish eggs

Size

3.9-4.9 feet long

Habitat

Near the coast in water less than 13 feet deep

Range

Found along the Pacific coast of North America, from the U.S. state of Oregon to Mazatlán in Mexico

Scalloped Hammerhead Shark

Scalloped Hammerhead

(Sphyrna lewini)

The largest scalloped hammerhead ever recorded was a female caught off the coast of Miami. She measured 10.7 ft long and reportedly weighed 440 lbs!

Diet

Fish such as sardines, mackerel, and herring

Size

4.9 to 8.2 feet

Habitat

Warm temperate and tropical coastal waters to a depth of 1,600 feet

Range

Worldwide from 46°N to 36°S

Cownose Rays

Cownose Ray

(Rhinoptera bonasus)

Cownose Rays use two modified fins on their front side to produce suction, allowing them to draw food into their mouths. They crush the food with their dental plates.

Diet

Clams, oysters, and other invertebrates

Size

45 inches in width

Habitat

Commonly found in soft mud or sand bottoms near coral reefs, though they are often found in the open ocean at depths of up to 98.4 feet

Range

Western Atlantic and Carribbean, from New England, United States to southern Brazil